"Get them to call me."

"Get them to call me more often!"

Program Description

First Day


8:00
-
8:45
General Introduction
Why are we here? What do we expect to accomplish? What do we do with what we develop? Included is a highly interactive exercise designed to get the attendees involved immediately and set a lively and enjoyable tone for the two-day session.
8:45
-
9:15
Introduction to the Program
Overview of the components:
  1. Developing a Proactive Mindset
  2. Applying a Proactive Mindset
  3. Executing a Proactive Mindset
  4. Winning with a Proactive Mindset
  5. Sustaining a Proactive Mindset
9:15
-
10:00
Developing a Pro-Active Mindset Introduction and Overview

What is a proactive mindset?

Controlling the circumstances and conditions that we encounter. In an interactive session, attendees talk about their experiences with attempting to be in control. The session yields common failings but also many success stories. The aim is to prove “you can do this!”

Being Proactive vs. Reactive
By seizing the day, proactive people have momentum on their side. Reactive people allow circumstances and conditions to control them. Reactive people are all too willing to bow to momentum running against them. Attendees share successes and failures. Instructors provide guidelines and processes to gain control of one's day and life.

Components of Being Proactive

  1. Identify areas that worry or concern you; develop a plan for getting ahead of the issue.
  2. Anticipate the next developments. Make a conscious effort not to be surprised.
  3. Draw on past successes for future issues. Learn from your victories and defeats.
  4. Don’t talk yourself out of success; be careful with language that limits you, for example: “I'm not good at this.” "This seldom works."

Instructors provide a baseline for this session. Attendees are invited to contribute from their own experiences. The objective is to help them develop an increased sense of confidence. When we have a good understanding of what is about to happen, we welcome change rather than fear it.

10:00
-
10:15
Break
10:15
-
12:00
Developing a Proactive Mindset

Traits of Successful Proactive Salespeople

As we make our way through this session, we are aiming for this summary moment. Synthesizing our discussions, we put together a model of a proactive salesperson and begin to measure ourselves against this standard on an individual and personal level.

SMART goals.

Like any performance-driven metric, goals need to be quantifiable and results-oriented. This familiar acronym has many different interpretations. Our preference is listed below:

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Actionable
  • Realistic
  • Time Sensitive

Priorities and the Value of Time

One of the most difficult challenges for any salesperson is setting priorities and placing a value on one’s time. We set priorities utilizing what is known as the Eisenhower Method, employed by then General Eisenhower for his military operations.

We base the system on the dimensions of urgency and importance and rate pending tasks on a combination of these considerations. The highest priority would be important and urgent. The lowest priority would be less important and less urgent.

Attitude

No one questions the value of a good attitude. But this rather vague descriptor does not do justice to the subject. In this section, we dwell on the practical aspects of the equation rather than the philosophical. For example, in each circumstance, we should ask ourselves, “What attitude am I bringing to this moment?” The group discussion revolves around these principles:

  • Awareness - Objectively characterizing one’s attitude.
  • Consequences - What is the result of the given attitude? (Ex. What do you gain from a positive attitude; what do you potentially lose with a lesser attitude?)
  • Preparation - Drawing on study habits from our school days, confidence comes from preparation. When we have prepared well, we tend to perform well. The group discusses practical examples of this principle.
  • Reward - By focusing on our end goal, we are able not only to perform better, but we also have the internal incentive to work through problems on the journey to success.
12:00
-
1:00
Lunch
1:00
-
1:30
Applying a Proactive Mindset
  • Identify aspects that are easy to assimilate.
  • Identify aspects that may be difficult to assimilate.
  • Examples of a proactive mindset.
1:30
-
3:00
Customer Intimacy
More than a buzzword, this concept is a sound business strategy. A consensus definition might well be: Customer Intimacy helps you build closer and longer-lasting relationships with your customers. It could be as simple as positioning yourself as a valued resource instead of just another vendor.

The key is doing all we can to understand the customer’s world, to help them become more successful. The more we focus on our customers, the more they value us and see us as an advisor, confidant, mentor, and resource. Accomplishing this requires a strategic mindset, a sharply focused approach, and perseverance.

The program consists of five components:

1. Raising the level of the discovery process.

The better information you have, the better resource you will be.

2. Qualifying business criteria.

Utilizing six matrices, develop a scoresheet for ranking potential customers and opportunities.

3. Customer retention and loss prevention

  • Why do we lose business?
  • General reasons and client-specific reasons.
  • Develop a plan to regain lost business.

Establish fundamental guidelines to prevent future lost business.

4. Match your unique benefits with their critical needs.

5. Develop a unified whole on behalf of your customer.

There is no need to address the unique challenges offered by working through a third party, such as adjusters or contractors. This segment is a form of self-scouting, both for RSFG representatives and other parties.

A candid and positive assessment leads to new ideas for both cooperation and an increased level of service for the end customer.

3:00
-
3:15
Break
3:15
-
5:00
Prospecting
Regardless of the specifics, prospecting is ultimately the key to success. As a successful chef requires the best ingredients, successful sales professionals require the best prospects.

This segment emphasizes three areas of the prospecting process:

  1. Develop a unique value proposition to position RSFG in the mind of prospects.
  2. Adopt a proven, systemized process that ensures continuing and measurable success.
  3. Set prospecting goals and committing to the process.

The segment also emphasizes the value of one’s time and provides a measurable standard for quantifying how to use one’s time most efficiently.

Second Day


8:00
-
8:30
Review of Day One – Concerns, Questions, and Answers
We review and addres questions and concerns from the previous day.
8:30
-
9:00
Executing a Proactive Mindset
Nothing different happens until someone does something different. We set the stage for executing a proactive mindset when it comes to the sales process and working with prospects and customers, specifically overcoming obstacles and, understanding and explaining benefits.
9:00
-
9:45
Overcoming Obstacles
Prospects seldom accept proposals without reservations. Every sales encounter runs into obstacles, whether they are legitimate or merely a negotiating ploy. It is essential to recognize each of these, to differentiate between them, and apply a unique strategy to each. We identify three types of obstacles and discuss how to overcome them.

Indifference

  • A customer is generally indifferent to us for one of two reasons:
  • They are satisfied with what they have.
  • They see no need for our benefit.

The applied strategy in each case would be

  • Discover an area of dissatisfaction or an area where you achieve higher than expected results.
  • Identify a need not realized by the prospect.

We discuss the principles in a workshop format and apply them to specific real-life case studies.

Skepticism

This attitude materializes when the prospect is interested in or values our solution but doubts our ability to provide it. The applied strategy here is to offer proof, generally, in the form of additional information, case studies, or references.

Objections

The most commonly thought-of obstacle, objections are divided into two levels:

  • Easy
  • Difficult

The easy objection usually based on a misconception and can be overcome with clarification.

Difficult objections occur when there truly is a drawback to our offering or capabilities. We must offset our limitations with more valuable aspects of what we have to offer.

9:45
-
10:00
Break
10:00
-
10:45
Understanding Benefits
What the customer truly buys. Most salespeople sell features; customers buy benefits. This fundamental disconnect is at the root of many sales failures. In this exercise, we list the perceived benefits offered by RSFG, and in the course of the discussion, we clearly define the difference between a benefit and a feature.

Salespeople typically talk about what something is; customers typically buy what it does. We should not say “We have. . .”, but rather, “You get. . .”. This session drives home the benefit-feature dichotomy in a powerful demonstration.

10:45
-
12:00
Winning with a Proactive Mindset
Closing is perhaps the most misunderstood component of the sales process. Many, if not most, salespeople visualize the close as an event at the culmination of the cycle. They miss the point that closing is the entire sales process. We close from the minute we meet a new prospect. Every aspect of what we do in the sales process is an intentional journey to the close. Our way of saying this is, “closing is a process, not an event.”
  • What is the true meaning of closing?
  • When do we know to close?
  • What must we do to close?
12:00
-
1:00
Lunch
1:00
-
1:45
Closing

Earning the Right to Close

Closing can be awkward for many salespeople because they view it as a standalone event that occurs at the end of the sales process. Closing can become clumsy for salespeople who don’t understand what goes into closing for it to be a smooth part of a process and a logical next step for both the salesperson and the customer. Before a salesperson can successfully close, six components must be present, and the salesperson must not only understand what they are but also have an awareness as to their presence. In this session, we discuss how and when to position the close.

Executing the Closing Process

Despite the points made in the preceding section, there still are certain key elements when one comes to the final closing process. They are:

1. The Prospect Accepts Your Value Statements

2. You have uncovered key, specific needs.

3. You have identified the economic buyer.

The person who can say yes to your proposal without having to check with anyone else. You have also identified The Buying Process (How decisions get made at your prospect company.

4. You build a consensus of all key influencers.

5. Present your solution.

Generally made to the person or committee who has the final say. You must leverage all agreements achieved at lower levels. The final decision-maker must also exert his/her influence on the outcome.

6. The prospect sees success.

Your proposal is firmly in the mind of the prospect. There is no difficulty visualizing your solution and the benefits of it, both personally and corporately.

In this session, we introduce these components, obtain buy-in, editing from the participants, and examine real-life situations that reflect the principles involved.

1:45
-
2:00
Break
2:00
-
4:30
Sustaining Proactive Mindset
Best practices are shared and dicussed for adopting and reinforcing a proactive mindset and making it a part of your lifestyle and culture.

We explore and evaluate additional methods to understand, create value propositions on a continuing basis.

4:30
-
5:00
Class Summary and Challenge to the Attendees

Dates, Locations, and Price

This program is being offered in Atlanta, GA and Denver, CO in July on the following dates:
Special RSFG network pricing. The price for the program is normally $1,194 person. However RSFG will subsidize your cost as follows:
  • If you send two attendees from your franchise, it is Buy one, Get One Free.
  • If you send one attendee, you will receive a 25% discount (new price: $895)

Atlanta, GA - July 14-15, 2020

Register for Atlanta, GA - July 14-15, 2020

Click here to register 1 attendee for the Atlanta program.
Click here to register 3 attendees for the Atlatna program.
Click here to register 2 attendees for the Atlanta program.
Click here to register 4 attendees for the Atlanta program.

Location for Atlanta, GA - July 14-15, 2020

SpringHill Suites Atlanta Airport Gateway
$189/night
Check-in: Monday, July 13
Check-out: Wednesday, July 15
Hotel Cut Off Date: June 22, 2020
Availability and Rate cannot be guaranteed after this date.
Click here to book your rooms at the SpringHill Suites Atlanta Airport Gateway

Denver, CO - July 21-22, 2020

Register for Denver, CO - July 21-22, 2020

Click here to register 1 attendee for the Atlanta program.
Click here to register 3 attendees for the Atlatna program.
Click here to register 2 attendees for the Atlanta program.
Click here to register 4 attendees for the Atlanta program.

Location for Denver, CO - July 21-22, 2020

Fairfield Inn & Suites Denver Airport
$169/night
Check-in: Monday, July 20
Check-out: Wednesday, July 22
Hotel Cut Off Date: June 29, 2020
Availability and Rate cannot be guaranteed after this date.
Click here to book your rooms at the SpringHill Suites Atlanta Airport Gateway

 

Subscribe to our newsletter!
Get tips and ideas to help you sell more.

Stay updated on our news and events! Sign up to receive our newsletter.